sustainable procurement Tag

Best Practice Framework Series #8: They Say “What Gets Measured Gets Managed”, So Are You Measuring?

How impactful is your sustainable procurement program? Without a way to measure a program’s outcomes, it is very difficult to know if you’re truly making an impact. Although measurement and reporting can be a challenge and often requires a lot of effort, it is important to consider it while establishing other preliminary elements like Policy, Strategy, and Action Plan.  

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Capturing Our Impact: Tracking Social Procurement KPIs

The CCSP met for the 6th Peer Exchange of the year on October 19th, focussed on tracking and measuring social procurement KPIs.

Wherever an organization is on their sustainable procurement journey, it’s never too early to start tracking KPIs and measure the Program’s impacts. KPIs should be tracked across all four pillars of sustainable procurement, but this month’s Peer Exchange dove into discussion on the social pillar. CCSP members heard from two organizations at different stages of their measurement journey: the City of Calgary and the City of Winnipeg.

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Best Practice Framework Series #7: Don’t Overlook Training and Communications

If an entire Sustainable Procurement Program is a 100-mile journey, 50 out of the 100 miles is allocated to Training and Communications. Typically, Training and Communications is the most undervalued element of Reeve’s 10-element Best Practice Framework. Organizations put effort into developing high quality Policies, Procedures, and Tools to build out solid infrastructure for their sustainable procurement program, however, they often neglect to effectively train staff and communicate to internal stakeholders. Without an understanding of sustainable procurement, staff and internal stakeholders cannot execute sustainable procurement effectively.

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Fostering Indigenous Culture Through Procurement

The CCSP was excited to kick off the second half of the 2023 programming on September 21st. In the spirit of the upcoming Truth and Reconciliation Day on September 30th, this month’s topic was Economic Reconciliation: Attracting Indigenous Suppliers.

Procuring with Indigenous businesses within the public sector not only aligns with the Government of Canada’s TRC Call to Action 92: Business and Reconciliation, but also helps support the growth and preservation of Indigenous companies, communities, and culture. As such, it is important that the public sector engages with Indigenous suppliers to help foster the economic resilience and cultural safety of Indigenous peoples.

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Best Practice Framework Series #5: Tools: Bridging the Gap

A Sustainable Procurement Program is only as impactful as its executors allow. Best Practice Framework elements like Strategy and Action Plan, Staffing and Resources, Policy, and HIPO Lists are crucial for building the strong foundation of a Sustainable Procurement Program, but are not always utilized in day-to-day purchasing decisions. This is why Tools are a crucial element of high performing Sustainable Procurement Program: they provide a tangible starting point, empowering procurement staff to translate sustainable procurement principles into actionable steps.

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Federal Government Incentivizes Supplier Climate Action via New Standard on Disclosure and Target Setting

The CCSP sat for the fourth Peer Exchange of the year on June 22nd. In this session, members received a special update directly from the Federal Government on its new Standard on the Disclosure of GHG Emissions and Setting of Reduction Targets. 

On April 1st, 2023, a new Federal Standard came into effect to further incentivize Canadian businesses to take action on reducing their carbon emissions. The Standard on the Disclosure of GHG Emissions and Setting of Reduction Targets applies to Federal procurements over $25 million and requires suppliers to measure and disclose their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and adopt a science-based target to reduce their emissions (in line with the Paris Agreement). Based on data from 2018 – 2021, this new Standard is projected to influence around 140 contract per year.

CCSP members heard from senior representatives from the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS), Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC), and Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) to learn more about how this standard is being implemented in procurement and the new disclosure initiative being managed by the Federal Government.

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Best Practice Framework Series #4: HIPO Lists: Don’t get Stuck in the Planning Phase

When building and implementing your sustainable procurement program, it is easy to get caught in a perpetual planning phase. Creating a Strategy and Action Plan, updating Policies and Procedures, and mapping Staffing and Resources are all important elements of a sustainable procurement program, but they are only a portion of a high impact program. The goal when implementing a high impact sustainable procurement program is to avoid spending too much time on planning while the organization spends thousands of dollars on high-risk product/service categories.

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Making the Most of your Environmental Procurement Criteria for Construction Projects.

The CCSP sat for the third peer exchange of the year on May 11th. This month’s topic: environmental impacts in construction. Read on to learn about certifications, lowering impacts of construction, embodied carbon, and some industry leaders in green building. 

With almost 40% of annual global emissions coming from the built environment1, there is an opportunity for the construction industry to become a pioneer in reducing global carbon emissions. Speakers from WSP, Mantle Developments and UBC enlightened CCSP members on the importance of setting sustainability priorities, reducing embodied carbon and planning for climate resilience.

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Leveraging Tools in your Procurement Process to Achieve Greater Sustainability Impact

CCSP’s April Peer Exchange focused on how tools support processes for sustainable procurement. Read this blog to learn more.

Many procurement teams struggle with consistent and meaningful consideration of sustainability within procurement practices. Tools are tangible resources – like checklists, worksheets, guides, or other reference materials – that you can get into the hands of buyers and business units to make sustainable procurement more accessible and standardized. Tools act as guidance throughout the procurement process which enables staff to integrate sustainability more meaningfully into their purchasing decisions.

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