The ‘How-To’ Guide You Always Knew You Needed

Are you passionate about fighting climate change, reducing waste, and improving the lives of your community members? Read the CCSP’s Sustainable Procurement Guide to find out what your role is in creating a greener, more ethically and socially responsible community with procurement.

 

Sustainable Procurement Guide

Cities across Canada are launching new commitments to fight climate change and build thriving, inclusive communities. Procurement is an emerging leverage point to meet those goals by integrating sustainability into city purchasing. Local government and public sector leaders are aware of the potential of sustainable procurement but aren’t sure where to get started. The Canadian Collaboration for Sustainable Procurement (CCSP) has released the ‘Sustainable Procurement Guide for Local Government and Public Sector Leaders’ to engage community members, city councillors, and sustainable procurement champions in discussions of the role they can play. It can be used as a starting point to get the conversation underway in your city to enact sustainable procurement programs, remove confusion, and help integrate existing sustainability initiatives.

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About the Guide:

The purpose of this guide is to enable government officials and community champions to not only better understand what sustainable procurement is, but also to drive sustainable procurement pilot projects and programs in their city. The guide was created by CCSP, a member network of Canadian public sector institutions who commit to aligning organizational spend with sustainable values. Through a partnership with the UBC Scholars program, CCSP curated the shared experiences of their members’ journeys for getting started on sustainable procurement at their institutions. The guide outlines key sustainable procurement terms to help you integrate language into your day-to-day conversations, definitions for the 4 pillars of sustainable procurement to elucidate the importance of each, a best practice framework that takes the guesswork out of getting started and more. The guide also debunks the most common myths that sow doubt into the power of sustainable procurement.

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Sustainable Procurement MythBusters:

“Sustainable goods and services are more expensive.”

Purchasing sustainable products or services now generally costs the same as buying traditional or less environmentally preferable products. When higher upfront costs exist, often overall benefits of sustainable products or services will create a valuable investment.

“Sustainable options are either not available or not as effective.”

The market for sustainable products has exploded in the last decade. Some product categories have a significant number of sustainable options, increasing the likelihood of receiving competitive bids if sustainable attributes are required.

“Implementing sustainable procurement will take too much time.”

Initially, sustainable purchasing does require some time investment to develop a policy framework, integrate sustainability into procurement processes, and to train staff, but tools are available to help integrate sustainability into all types of procurement practices.

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Join the Movement

There’s more where that came from! The Canadian Collaboration for Sustainable Procurement (CCSP) is a member-based network of Canadian public-sector institutions working together to align their spending with their values and commitments on sustainability. Our members meet virtually to network, share information, and co-create tools to better address green, social and ethical opportunities and risks in their supply chain. At 40 members strong, our network provides support and opportunities for collaboration across the nation. There’s no need to go this route alone; reach out to CCSP for support in getting started on your sustainable procurement journey. We all get started somewhere!

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Download the Guide Here

Join Our Team as a Sustainable Procurement Consultant!

We’re looking for a new full-time Project Consultant based in Vancouver to assist with sustainable supply chain work.

Since 2004, Reeve Consulting has worked with clients in the public and private sector to identify their sustainability priorities and activate social and environmental opportunities in their supply chains.  We are a small firm that works with big clients. We are known as thought-leaders that help clients find simple solutions to complex sustainability challenges.

 

Role Summary

  • Start Date: September 2021
  • Hours: Ongoing regular salaried role @ 4 days/week (32h/week)
  • Location: Vancouver, British Columbia
  • Supervisor: Tim Reeve, President and Company Founder
  • Pay: Based on experience and qualifications

 

We’re inviting a highly motivated individual to join our team; someone passionate about helping organizations advance the circular economy and the United Nation’s SDGs by harnessing the power of their procurement activities. We require someone with outstanding communication skills, strong attention to detail, with 2-3 years experience working on sustainability and/or procurement projects; preferably in a consulting role. Working with the company President and other Project Managers, the Sustainable Procurement Consultant supports key client work and marketing tasks for the firm.

We are offering ongoing regular employment based on a 4 day/32-hour workweek. We don’t typically work Friday’s at Reeve if we can avoid it. Candidates should have their own current laptops equipped with MS Office and a mobile phone.

 

Duties and Responsibilities

  • Creating client deliverables such as policies, tools, action plans, reports, presentations, etc.
  • Delivering client projects on time and on budget, including developing work plans, tracking project expenses, and providing progress updates to key stakeholders.
  • Supporting project meetings, note-taking, and coordinating project follow-up tasks.
  • Drafting, editing and report production, including large document formatting.
  • Preparing and delivering workplans with other consultants, team members, and associates.
  • Preparing and facilitating workshops and presentations in-person and on Zoom.
  • Researching sustainable supply chain trends, best practices, and related issues.
  • Organizing thought-leader interviews, note-taking and summarizing research findings.
  • Leveraging communication skills to develop strong relationships with clients and partners.
  • Supporting marketing, proposal writing and developing new opportunities to grow the firm.

 

Required Skills and Qualifications

  • 2-3 years’ experience working in sustainable procurement, corporate ESG or supply chain.
  •  Post-secondary degree in sustainability, business, and/or related disciplines.
  • Highly knowledgeable about sustainability, responsible sourcing and circular economy principles.
  • Basic knowledge of procurement processes within private and public sector organizations.
  • Extremely organized and capable of managing multiple projects, deadlines and relationships.
  • Excellent verbal and written communication skills with full English fluency.
  • Excellent research and analytical skills.
  • Basic document formatting skills and ability to produce great looking reports, tables, etc.
  • Outstanding judgement and proven trustworthiness.
  • Creative, curious, with a collaborative attitude and problem-solving working style.
  • Independent worker and thinker.
  • Proven skills with MS Office and other business software tools, including Zoom, Dropbox, CRM,
    and project management tools.

 

Desired Skills and Experience

  • Direct experience working as a consultant within a firm or independently.
  • Experience with facilitation, presenting, and public speaking.
  • Talented in developing and managing relationships with potential clients and partners.
  • Strong diplomacy and ability to facilitate decision-making and consensus within groups.
  • Well-practiced analytical, critical thinking and creative problem-solving skills.
  • Ability to master and teach new software applications.
  • Marketing experience and ability to use digital platforms and social media to promote projects (e.g., LinkedIn, MailChimp, WordPress).
  • Deep networks within the BC, Canadian or broader sustainability communities.
  • Ability to work in French.

 

This position offers a great opportunity to make a significant contribution to the inner workings of a small consultancy and offers potential for career growth. It will expose the successful candidate to in-depth work on a wide variety of projects and with a wide variety of clients.

Reeve Consulting knows that diverse teams are strong teams. We welcome people from all identities, backgrounds and experiences. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply, although Canadians and Permanent Residents will be given priority. Only those selected for an interview will be contacted. No phone inquiries please.

 

How to Apply

Send a cover letter and resume to info@reeveconsulting.com with “Application: Sustainable Procurement Consultant” in the subject line by August 19th, 2021 at 5 pm.

Trade Agreement Scrabble – achieving a triple word score!

Trade Agreements afford lots of room for social outcomes; they’re not as daunting as they seem!

 

Public sector institutions are increasingly pursuing social and indigenous procurement opportunities that improve the lives of disadvantaged individuals and communities. Like the dreaded ‘X’ in a hand of Scrabble, Procurement professionals often point to trade agreements as a barrier to pursuing social and indigenous outcomes.  While there are some trade agreement no-no’s, there is plenty of room for triple bottom line results.

Public sector organizations such as municipalities and academic institutions must follow trade agreements which establish rules ensuring fair and open access to government contracts for all suppliers. While they do add increased requirements, trade agreements are based on principles such as no obstacles and non-discrimination, which everyone would agree are necessary to fair procurement. They have financial thresholds above which certain rules apply, such as following a competitive bidding process, posting bids publicly, and including evaluation criteria and weighting.

For procurement professionals wanting to take sustainable procurement to the next level, it’s important to understand what is and isn’t allowed.

 

Trade Agreements and their Thresholds

Canada has hundreds of trade agreements in effect. We will discuss two that are particularly relevant for social and indigenous procurement strategies:

  • New West Partnership Trade Agreement (NWPTA) which applies to BC, AB, SK, and MB
  • Canada Free Trade Agreement (CFTA)

 

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The Exception or the Rule

The good news is that trade agreements provide exceptions to the rules that enable institutions to achieve broader social policy objectives.  There are at least two exceptions that provide room for the supplier diversity component of social procurement:

      1. Procurements from philanthropic institutions, non-profit organizations, or persons with disabilities.
      2. Measures adopted or maintained “relating to Aboriginal peoples”.

So, what does this mean in practice? Below the thresholds (identified in the table above) the trade agreement rules do not apply; contracts can be set aside for social enterprises and indigenous businesses indiscriminately though to ensure value for money, buyers should still follow sound contract management practices. Above trade agreement thresholds, you need to be more nuanced.

When contracting above a threshold, you can’t restrict competition but you can seek positive social outcomes from all bidders. Nor can you give preference to local goods, services or businesses but you can require bidders to provide community benefits such as subcontracting to social enterprises or hiring people with barriers to employment.

And for Indigenous businesses and social enterprises, exceptions can apply; contracts can be set aside for social enterprises and Indigenous businesses.

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Put it into Practice

Manitoba Housing owns and manages thousands of housing units that experience high turnover, necessitating a steady stream of repairs. This type of steady, recurring work is ideal for social enterprises. Manitoba Housing uses the exception for non-profit organizations to set aside over $1M annually in maintenance and repair work and contracts directly with five different social enterprises. Full report here.

Trade Agreements are often cited as barriers to social procurement, but they’re not. There are one or two no-no’s but there is lots of room for action.  As a procurement professional, you can set aside contracts for social enterprises and indigenous businesses below and above thresholds; and you can include community benefit requirements that all suppliers must meet. It’s time to play your hand and achieve your triple-word score: can you spell ‘xylophone’?

CPO’s Talk Sustainable Procurement Value and Common Myths

Would you like to know what Canadian CPO’s think about the value of sustainable procurement? Interested in the truth about costly myths for moving forward with impactful programs? Read on to find out!

 

The Annual CCSP CPO Panel Peer Exchange was held on June 10th to an audience of over 80 individuals from organizations across Canada. Each year the CCSP is privileged to have Canadian leadership join us for an hour-long webinar to get an annual outlook on the status of Canadian sustainable procurement in the public sector and how CPOs are framing the value of sustainable procurement.

Our expert panelists this year were Karen Jensen, Director of Corporate Procurement at BCLC, Alexander Ralph, Chief Procurement Officer and Director of Supply Chain Management at the City of Vancouver, and Stefane Belleau, Executive and Head of Supply Chain, Strategic Sourcing and Procurement at CBC Radio Canada. And just in case you missed it, we’ve summarized the entire discussion into a quick 3-minute read!

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How does your CFO value sustainable procurement?

For organizations that have been developing their sustainable procurement programs for some time, purchasing sustainably is about seizing opportunities as much as addressing potential risks in their supply chains. Our CPO Panelists all agreed that the value behind sustainable procurement doesn’t just come from the money saved, but the value added through long-term return on investment. Alex Ralph pointed out that while purchasing sustainably is the morally correct thing to do, research* has shown that every dollar invested into sustainable procurements is stretched and multiplied. Other reasons CFOs are backing sustainable procurement include:

      1. The opportunity to work internally with other departments with similar goals.
      2. Visualize broader areas of impact through a positive ripple effect.
      3. Avoid risks in the supply chain.
      4. Align spending with corporate mandate.

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“As we are trying more and more to understand priorities and see how we can resonate with our communities, we want to have those success stories of how procurement can resonate in our communities as well.”Karen Jensen

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Sustainable Procurement Myth-busters

Myth: Sustainable procurement is more costly.

In fact, panelists agreed that through total cost of ownership (including maintenance costs, end of life disposal etc.), it is possible to save money through sustainable procurement. By using TCO, the pricing evaluation is changed, and you are able to see the total cost of a product or service throughout its lifecycle. The evolution of technology has also made green products more affordable and more widely used, so products that were once prohibitively expensive are becoming more reasonable through TCO and initial cost.

Similarly, Stefane Belleau has found that many existing suppliers meet the sustainability criteria without added RFP specifications. When it was once difficult to obtain sustainable options from suppliers, now it is becoming ready-baked into services without an added cost.

Myth: Sustainable procurement increases the length of the procurement process.

In fact, including sustainable procurement specifications into the process is simply adding a few new questions into the research that is already being done at BCLC. For Karen Jensen looking at sustainable requirements doesn’t add any new steps, just new questions. The process of conducting market research, engaging suppliers, and encouraging suppliers to innovate takes the same amount of time with sustainable specifications added in.

 

Our panelists agreed on a key message; sustainable procurement is worth the effort. The ripple effect caused by strong sustainable procurement programs can create valuable ROI and meaningful outcomes for communities. And it doesn’t need to be difficult! Sustainable procurement is quickly becoming standard for procurement processes and can be less costly in the long run. There’s no excuses now; go forth and integrate sustainability into your everyday procurements.

 

*Research to support procurement has strong ROI

https://www.mhlnews.com/global-supply-chain/article/22044397/sustainable-procurement-can-lead-to-cost-savings

https://resources.ecovadis.com/whitepapers/roi-sustainability-responsible-business-practices

 

 

 

5 Factors for High-Impact Sustainable Procurement

 Are you aiming to get more meaningful change and positive social impact through your procurement? We’ve heard from over 40 organizations that these 5 success factors are key contributors to sustainable procurement that drives positive change in the supply chain.

Over the last 24 months Reeve Consulting has interviewed over 40 supply chain and sustainability representatives from governments, crown corporations and private sector organizations on the essential elements of sustainable procurement and what it takes to move beyond Policy to actual action and impact on the ground.

We’ve summarized the results of these practitioner interviews and collated the 5 success factors that are most commonly cited for creating high-impact sustainable procurement program.

 

1. Put your priorities into policy and spread the word

Utilize sustainable procurement to align organizational practices with values. The priorities identified within a sustainable procurement policy and program should cascade down and align with the priorities in your top-level sustainability plans and corporate strategies. Creating a policy defines sustainable procurement priorities and provides guidance to staff and suppliers on how sustainability will ‘show up’ within different forms of procurements.

 

2. Follow a two track program of building and doing

Policy is important; but policy alone does not drive action and it takes time to approve and begin to implement. Follow a two-track program that simultaneously works on ‘high impact procurement opportunities’ (HIPOs) while also taking the time to intentionally put in place the 10 elements of a high performing program. Do not wait for a policy to be perfected before integrating some social or environmental considerations into some of the products and services you are buying right now.

 

3. Form your fantasy sustainable procurement team

The partnership between the Procurement and Sustainability groups is especially important for the development of a high impact program, to drive more sustainability thinking into the planning and needs assessment stages of the procurement process. This powerful partnership can deliver a compelling message by communicating in internal working groups and sharing cross-developmental goals. When sustainable and procurement groups champion common values to the organization, leadership listens.

 

4. Set your staff up for success with tools and training

Deploy simple tools that can enable staff to begin to self-identify the sustainable risks and opportunities that might be relevant to their purchasing decisions. Engage a robust training  plan that encourages staff to be resourceful and facilitates discussion. Leverage early wins and repeat as required until a culture evolves that looks for opportunities.

 

5. Have a chat with your supplier over the garden wall

Working directly with suppliers is an approach to achieve impact without a formal program in place. Collaborate with vendors to address sustainability opportunities in your supply chain outside of traditional RFx processes. Consider asking suppliers if they have environmentally preferable options available, especially with more mature markets, where there is a less noticeable disparity in costs.

 

Realize your program’s full potential

Consider the benefits you could see by asking your supplier to engage with a social value business, or the increased efficiency of staff if they were trained to identify procurement opportunities and are supported by a cross-organizational working group. While policy can align your values and provide guidance when purchasing it is important to remember that policy by itself rarely gets the job done alone. Stay focused on a few program elements that will create an impact in the next six months.

 

Use the CCSP Benchmarking Framework or have your program maturity assessed by groups like Reeve Consulting to learn how to focus your efforts to higher impact quicker.

Ready, Set, Go Green your Fleet!

 

Green and alternative fuel vehicles are at the front of mind for most organizations across Canada, and with recent innovations in the sector it’s easy to get excited about fleet procurement opportunities. And it’s right on time. Transportation-related emissions make up 23% of Canada’s total greenhouse gas emissions. Light duty vehicles including passenger vehicles and trucks make up 50% of emissions; heavy duty vehicles account for 35%. Reducing fleet emissions is central to Corporate Sustainability Strategies in both the public and private sectors. Every major city in Canada includes Fleet GHG reductions in their Corporate Sustainable Plans and Purchasing has a central role to play in meeting these goals.

 

The 3 pillars of Green Fleets

1. Electrifying the Fleet – i.e. replacing vehicles with electric options and establishing an effective and accessible charging

2. Fueling the Fleet – i.e. purchasing fuel with renewable, biologically derived content (e.g., B20).

3. Optimizing the Fleet – i.e. using technology and driver behaviour to reduce emissions.

 

Participants heard from Calgary’s Jack Nott, Team Lead of Acquisitions, Fleet Services and Vancouver’s Evan Dacey, Acting Branch Manager, Fleet Strategy and Asset Management about their progress on the three pillars. They covered issues such as costs, market maturity, the business case for EV’s, RFX requirements, and provided expert opinions on questions from those in attendance.

 

How to Specify

Rather than prescribing vehicle specifications, Calgary includes performance criteria such as “reduced energy consumption is preferred” — asking vendors to state all available low emissions, alternative fuels and EV options and demonstrate how these options reduce energy use. Having information on all technologies gives Calgary flexibility to negotiate them into the contract and sends a signal to the market. When asked if this reduced the numbers of bidders, Jack said it was quite the opposite.  The number of bidders increased, and every bidder included EV chassis pricing.

 

The Business Case

The upfront capital cost of EVs is a barrier. Considering the total cost of ownership can shift the balance in favour of EVs. In a recent RFP, Calgary found that the Chevy Bolt and Tesla 3 had the lowest total cost of ownership for compact and mid-size cars, respectively based on three simple questions:

 

1. How much is it?

2. How much does it cost to maintain?

3. How much does it cost in fuel to drive it a certain distance?

 

 

Vancouver cited additional benefits that offset the cost of medium and heavy-duty trucks including:

  • Internal carbon price of $150/tonne which effectively increases a department’s operating budget.
  • Worker health benefits associated with noise reduction on the job.

 

Pilots Projects

Another challenge in electrifying the Fleet is limited supply in vehicle categories such as medium and heavy-duty trucks. So, City of Vancouver is conducting pilot projects rather than following a more conventional RFP process.

Here’s how Vancouver approached it:

1. Conducted an RFEOI to better understand the market.

2. Issued an RFA (Request for Application) and pre-qualified three vendors.

 

 

They are now working with three vendors to test 4 chassis models on 2 cube vans and 2 refuse trucks.

 

With so much information, greening fleet vehicles can seem daunting; what we learned from Jack Nott at the City of Calgary, and Evan Dacey at the City of Vancouver is that this is not the case. By asking simple questions of their suppliers, deviating from conventional methods when necessary, and encouraging flexibility from their vendors, Calgary and Vancouver are now piloting innovative technologies instead of piloting policies.

Just Released: The CCSP’s 2020 State of the Nation Report on Sustainable Public Procurement in Canada

The Canadian Collaboration for Sustainable Procurement (CCSP) has just released its Annual State of the Nation Report which showcases the efforts of its 30 member institutions to align their spending with their sustainability commitments. The report highlights that despite the effects that COVID-19 has had on their supply chains and organizational budgets this national community has still managed to advance their social, ethical, Indigenous, and green procurement goals. . In a difficult year, these member institutions shifted to procurements that benefit local and global communities and hopefully inspire other public-sector institutions to join the sustainable procurement movement.

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About the State of the Nation Report

The Annual State of the Nation on Public Procurement in Canada highlights the latest sustainable procurement trends, features member success stories from across the country and includes the popular ‘moon chart’, which benchmarks CCSP members progress towards high impact programming that shows demonstratable outcomes. Information for the report was gathered through interviews with CCSP members from November 2020 to February 2021.

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Top 5 Sustainable Procurement Trends of 2020

2020 Annual Report on the State of Sustainable Public Procurement in Canada

The public sector saw a shift in priorities this year as COVID-19 affected buying-power, single-use plastics usage, work environments, and prompted discussions of Living Wage policies. Organizations like universities, cities, and crown corporations were forced to refocus their priorities towards emergency response efforts, and sustainable procurement efforts were left with reduced resources. Some trends to emerge from these circumstances include:

  1. The Return of the Disposable: Single-Use Plastics Explode
  2. Living Wage Programs Explode to Help Front-Line Workers
  3. City Councillors Mainstream Buying for Good
  4. COVID Response Efforts Turbo-Charge Buying from Local SME’s
  5. Increased IT Purchasing to Support At-Home Workers

Social and Indigenous procurement was by contrast, boosted by the Black Lives Matter movement and the Canadian pipeline and railway protests. These movements brought forth national conversations on racial inequalities, economic disparity, and reconciliation, and have led to increased attention to opportunities for inclusion in procurement.

 

Success Stories

The City of Nanaimo began their Urban Clean-Up Program in response to concerns voiced by downtown residents and businesses about the impacts that social issues were having on the urban areas of the city, such as litter and debris. The City reached out directly to the Nanaimo Region of the John Howard Society and together they hired individuals with barriers to employment, such as those who have experienced homelessness or incarceration, to clean up discarded needles and other debris. The program has been successful both for the hired participants, who are receiving a fair wage and work experience, and for the resulting cleanliness of the downtown area.

The Government of Yukon advanced reconciliation through infrastructure procurement by engaging local Indigenous groups and contracting to Indigenous workers . In Yukon, where 23% of the territory’s total population is Indigenous (2016) and 11 out of their 14 First Nations are self- governing, the Government of Yukon has long considered Indigenous peoples as key partners. The project has set new standards for acknowledging Indigenous citizens impacted by infrastructure projects in their communities.

 

The CCSP community has made great strides this year despite unfavourable circumstances and have championed sustainable procurement in Canada for another year. We encourage you to download the full report here and contact Erin Unger, Program Manager for the CCSP should you be interested in learning more about the community.

Respecting the Process of Indigenous Procurement

Are you trying to align your organization’s spending with your reconciliation agenda? Or are you wondering how to get started on Indigenous Procurement? On April 6th, the Canadian Collaboration for Sustainable Procurement (CCSP) hosted its second Peer Exchange of 2021 and delved into these and several other discussion questions with practitioners from the Greater Victoria Harbour Authority and the City of Thunder Bay with almost 80 leaders in procurement and sustainability from across Canada.

As organizations continue to discover the major role that Indigenous businesses play in the Canadian economy, the importance of timely and respectful Indigenous Procurement becomes very real. The CCSP has recently restructured its sustainable procurement model and definition to include a 4th pillar, Indigenous Procurement, to reflect the unique aspect of this work. One of the fundamental elements of an Indigenous Procurement program is having a easily understood definition of what characterizes an Indigenous business. While different organizations have varying definitions of an Indigenous Business, the commonly accepted definition is as defined by the Government of Canada for the purposes of their work in this areas is is “An Indigenous firm is one which is 51% owned and controlled by Indigenous persons.”

Judy Kitts, First Nations Engagement Officer at the Greater Victoria Harbour Authority (GVHA) began her presentation by providing an overview of their definition and how GVHA actively pursues opportunities with Indigenous businesses. Judy stressed the importance of helping Indigenous supplier to navigate their way through the RFP process. Judy has created an Indigenous Business Directory of 35 businesses whom she stays in touch with regularly to maintain strong relationships. As with many organizations, COVID-19 has reduced the GVHA budget and therefore Judy has found new ways to champion Indigenous businesses, such as:

 

      1. Continuing to build and maintain relationships with Indigenous suppliers, even when there is no immediate plan to procure.
      2. Leave positive public reviews for Indigenous businesses on business review sites like Yelp.
      3. Encourage other regional institutional buyers to direct award to Indigenous businesses in their Indigenous Business Directory.

Dan Munshaw, Manager of Supply Management at the City of Thunder Bay reiterated the importance of the 4th CCSP sustainable procurement pillar, and the investment Indigenous procurement requires to further growth. Dan attributed the trust he has built with several Indigenous communities to at least three key steps:

      1. Do your homework; Learn about your local, regional and national Indigenous communities, and the historic and modern treaties that manage land claim agreements.
      2. Get out of the office; Take time to build relationships and attend local Indigenous celebrations or pow wows.
      3. Practice two eyed seeing; Commit to unlearning colonial practices and views and educate yourself on Indigenous values.

A common message both Judy and Dan shared is that policy without action will accomplish little, and in fact it might even negatively impact your relationships with the Indigenous businesses you hope to procure from. The key to sustained success is a relationship built on trust: thoughtful actions and advocacy within your organization for Indigenous businesses is a must.

CCSP Launches 12th Year of Operation to a Full House

CCSP cohort kicks off new year validating some old themes.

 

The CCSP kicked off its 2021 program with its first Peer Exchange webinar of the season on February 25th, featuring an assembly of almost 70 individuals representing organizations from coast to coast across Canada. Now in its 12th year of operation, the CCSP is a member-based network of 30 Canadian public sector institutions working together to align their spending with their values and sustainability commitments.

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It was impressive to see how the broader sustainable procurement movement is growing in breadth and depth as members and guests engaged in lively discussion about some important elements of successful sustainable procurement. Members talked about taking a holistic, value driven approach to sustainable procurement that looks at the unique green, indigenous, social and ethical risks or opportunities that applied to their procurement objectives. We heard how important it is to follow a ‘two-track’ program that simultaneously works on building out the 10 elements of a successful program, while looking ahead to upcoming significant procurements.

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Two CCSP members, the City of Winnipeg and the City of Nanaimo shared their individual Success Stories that are highlighted in the upcoming 2020 CCSP Annual Report. The City of Winnipeg used sustainability specifications within an RFP when looking to procure a fleet of multi-function printers and was impressed to receive sustainability features and services that more than met their targets at no additional cost over the previous contract. The City of Nanaimo saw an opportunity to create social value while addressing cleanliness issues by contracting with community groups with workers facing barriers to employment to clean up discarded needles and debris in the downtown area. A key message shared by both cities is that our communities, global and local, are counting on us to make positive change and that actions both small and large will get us that much closer to our sustainable goals.

Coming Soon…

Each year the CCSP produces an Annual Report that details the trends and best practices within sustainable public procurement in Canada. The 2020 Annual Report will be released soon to our members and will be made public in the coming month of April. Stay tuned for the biggest trends in sustainable procurement, inspiring success stories and CCSP updates from the past year.

 

The successful kickoff to the CCSP 2021 program has got us eager for more! We are looking forward to hosting CCSP members and some incredible speakers at our upcoming Peer Exchange webinar and many more to come. We hope to see you there!

 

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WRITTEN BY: ERIN UNGER, PROGRAM MANAGER AT THE CANADIAN COLLABORATION FOR SUSTAINABLE PROCUREMENT (CCSP)

WANT TO STAY UP TO DATE WITH OTHER SUSTAINABLE PROCUREMENT NEWS IN CANADA? FOLLOW THE CCSP ON LINKEDIN AND SIGN-UP TO THE CCSP’S MONTHLY NEWSLETTER.

Sustainable Procurement Events for your Spring Calendar

While we may be home-bound for a bit longer due to COVID-19, that doesn’t mean we can’t fill our calendars with opportunities to learn and be social! At Reeve, we’ve gathered a collection of top tier sustainable and procurement themed webinars that we are looking forward to and want to share in the anticipation.With eyes on the horizon for the return of in-person events, we have gained a new appreciation for the ease and accessibility online events can provide. Let’s make the most of it this spring and enjoy a few more online events we can attend in our lounge-wear!

 

Tips for Attending Online Events

Before the Event

  • Create at least one learning goal and one business development/networking goal.
  • If possible, identify 1-3 people, either speakers or other attendees you’d like to connect with.
  • Prepare 1-3 questions in advance, knowing these may change during the actual event.

During the Event

  • Ask your 1-3 questions. Adapt as required and don’t forget to mention where you are from.
  • Connect with other attendees, most online events will have a chat function, so don’t forget to introduce yourself and use it.
  • Make note of anyone asking questions relevant to your own work and try to connect with them through the chat.

After the Event

  • Connect with the speakers and other attendees on LinkedIn to keep the conversation going.
  • Summarize your main take-away’s / learnings from the event and share back with your team.

 

Thesis Live Webinar Series

The Sustainability Consortium, in partnership with SupplyShift are reviewing supplier engagement methods to provide sustainability performance insights into your own supply chain, and access data customers often want reported. The  three upcoming webinars in the series include:

1. Unlocking Supply Chain Transparency with SupplyShift’s Upstream Engagement Tools March 9th 

2. Tackling Food Waste in your Supply Chain March 11th 

3. Navigating your Renewable Energy Journey / April 13th

 

Buy Social Canada Symposium

Buy Social is hosting the return of their Canada Symposium on April 26th; an opportunity to learn and celebrate social procurement and the effects it has to shape economies and communities. This event will feature four diverse discussions led by leaders in social procurement, breakout themed networking sessions to allow for networking with other guests, and the Social Procurement Champion Awards to recognize organizations making admirable progress in social procurement across Canada.

Find out more and register here.

 

 

Procurement Leaders Innovation Series

In a four part series, the Procurement Leaders aim to provide the opportunity to optimize your current procurement strategies with a panel of expert global speakers. You can expect session formats from industry roundtables, micro breakouts, CPO spotlights and the opportunity to engage with other attendees.

1. Innovation in Positive Growth / March 16th – 18th 

2. Innovation in Resilient Supplier Networks / April 27th – 29th 

3. Innovation in Digitalization and Technology / May 25th – 27th 

4. Innovation in Asia Pacific / June 15th – 16th

 

CAMSC Diversity Procurement Fair 2021

The Canadian Aboriginal and Minority Supplier Council is getting ready to provide you with some fresh insights from diverse businesses April 20, 21, 27 & 28. This interactive virtual conference will provide a platform for Canadian small businesses and exporters to connect with the U.S. and Corporate Buyers. Attendees can expect an export forum, industry focused panels, sourcing roundtables, matchmaking and networking events, all with the intention to further collaboration and brainstorming.

Find out more and register here.

 

Going Global

 

GLOBE Capital 2021

GLOBE Capital is hosting an impressive collection of North American and global leaders, investors, innovators, and policymakers at what is expected to be a conference that will accelerate transformation towards a cleaner economy on April 13th to 15th. This grand forum offers the opportunity to make connections through the matchmaking and networking program and learn about best practices and emerging policies.

Find out more and register here.

 

The United Nations 2021 SDGs Learning, Training, and Practice

The 2021 United Nations High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development will be held from July 6th to July 15th. This series will include capacity building and knowledge learning sessions on topics related to the implementation of the SDGs under review. All sessions will be live-streamed, recorded and open to all participants.

Find out more information here.

 

 

 

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WRITTEN BY: ERIN UNGER, PROGRAM MANAGER AT THE CANADIAN COLLABORATION FOR SUSTAINABLE PROCUREMENT (CCSP)

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